How Much Sugar?

My first loaf baked with Dextrose

  • 08 Mar 2011 4:31 AM
    Message # 541222
    Deleted user
    I am so excited. I have just baked my first loaf using Dextrose instead of sugar. I bake Spelt bread for my husband's lunch sandwich to take to work.

    I use a bread maker to make my bread and have tended to follow the recipe set out in the guide book. I first checked that the yeast would react with the dextrose by putting a tablespoon of Dextrose with a little dried yeast in warm water. It reacted really well.

    So I substituted the dextrose for the sugar, using the same amount as I usually use but I added an extra 10 mls. of water, having read David and Lizzie's advise on adding a bit more water to recipes.
    My loaf came out absolutely perfect. Even more, it looked and rose better than with sugar. It feels that dextrose and bread making are made for each other!!!

    But when I searched the net, nothing at all comes up about using Dextrose to bake bread.
  • 08 Mar 2011 8:22 PM
    Reply # 541803 on 541222
    Freda Surgenor wrote: I am so excited. I have just baked my first loaf using Dextrose instead of sugar. I bake Spelt bread for my husband's lunch sandwich to take to work.

    I use a bread maker to make my bread and have tended to follow the recipe set out in the guide book. I first checked that the yeast would react with the dextrose by putting a tablespoon of Dextrose with a little dried yeast in warm water. It reacted really well.

    So I substituted the dextrose for the sugar, using the same amount as I usually use but I added an extra 10 mls. of water, having read David and Lizzie's advise on adding a bit more water to recipes.
    My loaf came out absolutely perfect. Even more, it looked and rose better than with sugar. It feels that dextrose and bread making are made for each other!!!

    But when I searched the net, nothing at all comes up about using Dextrose to bake bread.

    Have you got a recipe for me?  I have a breadmaker in the back of the cupboard somewhere so would love some info or any hints.  Sounds lovely.  How does the bread keep and is it heavy like damper or like shop bread.


     

  • 09 Mar 2011 6:59 AM
    Reply # 542045 on 541803
    Deleted user
    Jan W. wrote:Have you got a recipe for me?  I have a breadmaker in the back of the cupboard somewhere so would love some info or any hints.  Sounds lovely.  How does the bread keep and is it heavy like damper or like shop bread.


     


    Yes, delighted.
    I use a mix of organic Wholemeal Spelt flour and organic plain white flour because Spelt flour is low in gluten and doesn't rise very well and makes for a heavy loaf, the small amount of white flour makes a well risen and light loaf.

    I get organic wholemeal Spelt flour from- "Simply No knead" in Victoria, they do  have it most of the time, phone: 03 9786 8266. If they don't have the organic, they sell the ordinary wholemeal Spelt flour, or you can get it from most health food shops.

    If you don't want to use Spelt, you can simply use 472 grams of wheat wholemeal flour, from any supermarket and you don't then need the white flour as the wheat wholemeal flour has enough gluten in it.

    Ingredients:
    372 grams wholemeal spelt flour
    100 grams organic plain white flour- I get this in Franklins, Coles or Woolworths.
    4 grams dried yeast
    2 tablespoons dextrose
    380 mls water to be hand hot.
    2 teaspoons sea-salt
    1 tablespoon oil (I use brown rice oil)

    Put the yeast in the bottom of the bread goblet, then the dextrose.
    Then the flours. Then mix the salt into the water so it dissolves and add it to the goblet, and last of all, add the oil.

    My bread-maker does a "bake quick" which goes for three instead of five hours and I find this the best time for spelt bread.

    The bread is quite light when it's first baked and my husband takes it to work, with a banana on the first day. After the first day, I keep it in a couple of plastic bags in the fridge because, as it has no preservative in it, it would go moldy very quickly. So it does tend to firm up in the fridge, but a light toasting makes it very nice and fresh again. Being kept in the fridge, it will easily last a week. Depends how quickly you eat it!

    Enjoy!




    Last modified: 09 Mar 2011 6:59 AM | Deleted user
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